Aggressive behavior

Aggressive behavior Definition Aggressive behavior is reactionary and impulsive behavior that often results in breaking household rules or the law; aggressive behavior is violent and unpredictable.

Aggressive behavior

Growling, shrieking Scratching Preparing for an all-out attack by rolling onto side or back and exposing all weapons: Who did he aggress toward? When and where did it happen? What was going on during the half-hour or so leading up to the incident? What Aggressive behavior about to happen to your cat?

Aggressive behavior problems in cats can be classified in different ways. A good way to understand why your cat is aggressive is to think about the function or purpose of the aggression.

If you consider all the reasons why cats behave aggressively, you can determine what motivates your cat to do so and identify what he might gain from his behavior. Between Cats The most obvious and easily understood type of aggression between cats occurs between unneutered males.

As males reach adulthood, they often begin to challenge each other for access to mates and territory. Tom cats who roam will get into threatening stand-offs and actual fights.

They sit or stand stiffly, their hackles up, and stare at each other. Their ears are swiveled backward, and they often growl, hiss and howl loudly. One cat might eventually slowly leave, or one or both of them might attack.

Aggression between household cats is more subtle and complex than the conflicts between two outdoor toms. The aggressor cat postures, and the recipient makes himself look smaller and may break away to avoid the aggressor. The aggression can occur between females or between females and males.

It can be related to physical size and activity large cats often intimidate smaller or less active catsto a lack of pleasant social experiences with other cats, to an accidentally learned association between the other cat and something unpleasant like fireworks or thunderor to a simple personality clash.

Please see our article, Aggression Between Cats in Your Householdfor more information about this problem. The more threatening the person, animal, object or sound seems to the cat, the more heightened his fear reaction will be. Typical body postures associated with fearful or defensive aggression are a combination of defensive signals such as crouching, flattening the ears, tucking the tail, leaning away or rolling onto the side, and pupil dilation and aggressive signals such as hissing and spitting, piloerection, growling, swatting, biting and scratching.

Aggressive behavior

Often the best way to deal with a defensively aggressive cat is to simply avoid him until he calms down. Territorial Animals of many species strive to expel or keep out other individuals from their territory, and cats are no exception. Both male and female cats are territorial, but males may defend larger territories than females.

A cat can show territorial aggression toward some family members and not others and toward some cats but not others.

Aggression - Wikipedia

Cats mark their turf by patrolling, chin rubbing and urine spraying. They may stalk, chase and ambush a targeted intruder while displaying offensive body postures, including hissing, swatting and growling.

Some cats take a slow and steady approach in their stalking, while others immediately and aggressively give chase. Some of the most common situations that trigger territoriality are:Passive Aggressive Behavior.

Sometimes the strongest clue to passive aggression is frustration with someone without a clearly identifiable reason.

Aggressive behavior

A person's feelings may be so repressed that they don't even realize they are angry or feeling resentment. A passive aggressive can drive people around them crazy and seem sincerely dismayed when confronted with their behavior.

The origins of the violent behavior are multifactorial and respond to the interaction of several factors --biological, cultural, social, etc.

-- which can modify the expression of the human behavior. Aggression is the second most common feline behavior problem seen by animal behaviorists.

Although cat aggression is sometimes taken less seriously than dog aggression—perhaps because cats are smaller and don’t pursue people to bite them—aggressive cats can be formidable.

Causes. Though it can be triggered by almost any stimulus, underlying issues typically contribute to aggressive behavior.

Abusing certain substances, such as alcohol and steroids, tends to increase rates of aggression, according to Peter N.S. Hoaken and Sherry H.

Stewart in an article published in the journal "Addictive Behaviors.". Aggression is the second most common feline behavior problem seen by animal behaviorists. Although cat aggression is sometimes taken less seriously than dog aggression—perhaps because cats are smaller and don’t pursue people to bite them—aggressive cats can be formidable.

Passive-aggressive behavior - Wikipedia