Mental health and cancer

Abstract The physical and mental health of cancer patients needs to be addressed not only during active treatment but also throughout the continuum of survivorship care. This commentary provides an overview of issues pertinent to cancer survivors, with an emphasis on mental health issues and recommendations for annual clinical screening and monitoring using recently published guidelines from the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

Mental health and cancer

Talk to your health care provider.

Mental health and cancer

Some treatments for cancer also can affect your feelings or make it hard for you to concentrate or remember things. Since May is Mental Health Awareness Month, now is a good time to understand that mental health care is as important as caring for your physical health during and after cancer treatment.

Chemo Brain Is Real! These concerns may affect patients during or after cancer treatments. Emotional and mental health problems that survivors may face—such as depression, anxiety, stress, and trouble sleeping—can all contribute to this and make thinking and learning harder.

You could have difficulty learning new facts or skills, concentrating, or remembering things during and after treatment. Talk to your health care provider about how you are feeling emotionally. You may also find that support groups for cancer survivors can be helpful places where you can talk to other people with similar experiences.

But you may also worry about life after cancer.

5 Things Cancer Survivors Should Know About Their Mental Health | | Blogs | CDC

It may take time before you are able to do some of the things you did before at work, at home, or in daily life. You may depend on other people for help more than you are used to, and you may worry about money and about your cancer coming back.

You Can Do Something About It… Talk to your health care team about how you feel—not just physically, but also mentally—before, during, and after treatment. They can refer you to health care providers who can help you manage these changes.

Talking to experts about ways you can adjust is very important, because mental health problems can get worse if they are ignored.

Your team can also give you tips for things that might improve your mental health, like diet, exercise, and getting enough sleep. Together, your physical and mental health care teams can help keep you as healthy as possible during this time of uncertainty and change.Oct 06,  · Continued.

The most common mental disorders affecting cancer patients were anxiety disorders and adjustment disorders, according to the study.

Neglecting Mental Health in Cancer Treatment | Psychology Today

Adjustment disorders occur when a . These concerns lead to an increased rate of mental health problems in this population.

According to an article from North Carolina Medical Journal, percent of cancer survivors reported poor mental health as compared to percent of adults without cancer. “As a primary care physician, this statistic is a red flag for me,” says Overholser.

Pre-existing mental health conditions can make it harder for a patient to cope after a breast cancer diagnosis, in turn negatively affecting their long-term physical and emotional health. A history of trauma can increase breast cancer survivors’ risk of chronic pain even after treatment.

May 17,  · Emotional and mental health problems that survivors may face—such as depression, anxiety, stress, and trouble sleeping—can all contribute to this and make thinking and learning harder. You could have difficulty learning new facts or skills, concentrating, or .

Although stress can cause a number of physical health problems, the evidence that it can cause cancer is weak. Some studies have indicated a link between various psychological factors and an increased risk of developing cancer, but others have not.

Apparent links between psychological stress and cancer could arise in several ways. Cancer and mental health are deeply personal, and the experience is individual for every person.

Mental health and cancer

Dr. David Wakefield, a Psychologist at our hospital in Tulsa, says he has seen firsthand the benefits of treating the whole person, not just the disease.

Mental Health and Cancer - Cancer Health